x
Ask our Doctors

Skin Renewal Doctors all have a broad knowledge, background and passion for aesthetic medicine. Please feel free to ask them your questions and concerns.

Conditions
Conditions

Skin and Ageing

Discover the incredible world of human skin, boasting an expansive surface area ranging from 1 to 1.5 square meters. Beyond its protective function, your skin is a dynamic organ brimming with vital roles and advantages. From managing metabolic waste elimination to fine-tuning body temperature and hosting an array of sensory receptors for pain, touch, and pressure, your skin is a multitasking marvel. Unveil the secrets to radiant skin as we explore how lifestyle choices, dietary habits, and overall health intertwine with age-related factors like hormonal fluctuations.
Download Brochure
Non-Invasive Skin Rejuvenation Treatments at Skin Renewal

The skin plays a vital role in the social and visual experience, as it can give away an individual's age and reflect the consequences of ageing. Everyone possesses a unique genetic blueprint and lifestyle, profoundly affecting the skin's physiological functions. By middle age, these influences may contribute to a staggering 50% decline in skin vitality.

As the skin ages, intricate biological changes unfold, including the depletion of fibrous tissue, decelerated cellular renewal, and diminished vascular and glandular networks. The skin's barrier function, crucial for hydration and protection, falters. Subcutaneous tissue undergoes flattening, particularly in facial, hand, and foot regions.

The effects of UV wavelengths and Infrared on your skin:

A suntan serves as evidence of skin damage, indicating the skin's effort to shield itself from further harm. UVA radiation, constituting most of total UVR (90–95%), penetrates deeply into the epidermis and dermis, triggering oxidative stress that prompts post-UV inflammation and melanin production, resulting in hyperpigmentation. Despite being mistakenly linked with health and vitality, this "tanned" appearance is a consequence of oxidative stress. 

UVB radiation, although a small portion of UVR (about 5%), is highly detrimental to DNA and epidermal keratinocytes, often leading to sunburn and non-melanoma skin cancer. While UV-B radiation stimulates vitamin D synthesis in the skin, achieving optimal vitamin D levels solely through sun exposure is not advisable due to the detrimental effects of excessive sun exposure. 

The connection between skin health and gut health:

The human skin hosts various microorganisms collectively known as the skin microbiota. This microbiota forms a complex interplay with the epidermis cells, the skin's outermost layer. Beneficial bacteria like Lactobacillus and Bifidobacteria have effectively treated certain infections, enhanced immunity, and reduced skin inflammation.

Oral intake of pre-and probiotics has been shown in vivo to rebalance the skin microbiota and enhance skin barrier function. Furthermore, oral probiotics bolster cellular antioxidant capacity and mitigate inflammation.

In addition to these benefits, probiotics are crucial in neutralizing toxic byproducts, protecting the intestinal lining, enhancing nutrient bioavailability, and strengthening the intestinal barrier against harmful microbes that could negatively impact skin health.

To prevent accelerated skin ageing, one can employ a multifaceted approach. This includes utilising topical interventions enriched with scientifically advanced ingredients like growth factors, peptides, and retinol, which aid in maintaining youthful skin structure and function. Additionally, incorporating targeted nutritional supplements can fortify the skin from within, promoting overall health and bolstering its resilience. By nurturing the body internally and externally, one can foster a harmonious balance that supports a healthy body and vibrant, youthful-looking skin.

Aesthetic procedures and modalities available at Skin Renewal for ageing skin:

In the dynamic world of cosmetic and medical aesthetics, advancements over the past two decades have led to many sought-after non-surgical treatments catering to the quest for youth and beauty. Skin Renewal clinics offer a range of minimally invasive procedures with minimal downtime and risks. These include laser treatments like Laser Genesis and PICO Laser, Intense Pulsed Light (IPL) therapies such as Limelight, hyaluronic acid-based fillers like Revanesse, Juvederm and Restylane, botulinum toxin injections like Botox and Dysport, chemical peels, radiofrequency procedures like Endymed, microdermabrasion, and mesotherapy.

Factors Contributing to Skin Ageing

Effects

Intense physical and psychological stress, alcohol intake, poor nutrition, overeating, environmental pollution, UV exposure

Premature skin ageing, uneven pigmentation, wrinkles, sagging skin, structural deterioration

Genetic factors such as hormonal status and metabolic reactions (oxidative stress)

Cellular ageing, replicative senescence, decreased cellular renewal, reduced vascular and glandular networks

Hormonal changes (decline in estrogen, testosterone, DHEA, growth hormones)

Thinning of skin, increased wrinkling, decreased moisture, slower cellular renewal

Oxidative stress (UV radiation, air pollution, glycation)

Collagen breakdown, altered cellular renewal cycles, DNA damage, inflammation, reduced skin immunity

Elevated blood sugar levels and glycation

Collagen abnormalities, loss of elasticity, increased rigidity, tendency to rashes and infections

Solar Ultraviolet Radiation (UVR) and Infrared (IR) Radiation

Photoaging, dermal connective tissue damage, decreased immunity, oxidative stress, inflammation, collagen degradation, depletion of antioxidants, failure of antioxidant defence systems

Tobacco Smoking

Oxidative stress, impaired blood flow and circulation, DNA damage, "smoker's skin" characteristics (fine lines, wrinkles, uneven tone, dehydration), improvement upon cessation

Pollution

Premature skin ageing, hyperpigmentation, sluggish skin cell renewal, correlation with poor health status, environmental toxin exposure

frequently asked
questions

How does your skin age with time?

Each individual has different genetic makeup and lifestyle habits, this will contribute to changes in normal physiological functions within the skin, and may lead to decline by 50% by middle age.

Within the skin, ageing is associated with various biological changes: a loss of fibrous tissue, a slower rate of cellular renewal, and a reduced vascular and glandular network.

Barrier function to protect the skin and maintain cellular hydration also becomes impaired. The subcutaneous tissue (hypodermis) flattens, particularly affecting the face, hands and feet.

To prevent rapid deterioration of youthful skin, action must be taken to support the skin's intrinsic defense systems. Fortunately, through the latest scientific innovations and practices, it is possible to dramatically slow down and potentially reverse the signs and symptoms of accelerated skin ageing.

What is the anatomy and function of the skin?

The skin comprises three distinct layers: the epidermis, dermis, and hypodermis, each with unique cellular compositions and functions.

  • The epidermis, the outermost layer, contains keratin and melanin, providing strength and colour, along with immune cells like Langerhans cells. It acts as a barrier against environmental stressors.
  • The dermis, beneath the epidermis, houses nerves, blood vessels, and fibroblasts, supporting the skin's structure with collagen, elastin fibres, and various substances like hyaluronic acid.
  • The hypodermis, the deepest layer, contains adipocytes and connective tissues, aiding in insulation and heat preservation. Additionally, the skin features sebaceous and sweat glands, which are crucial for moisture production, bacterial protection, and thermoregulation.
What are dietary strategies to promote combat skin ageing?

The skin's visual prominence makes it a focal point for the beauty industry's efforts to enhance appearance through topical treatments. Yet, the importance of supporting skin health from within often goes overlooked. Proper nutrition and supplementation play crucial roles in achieving vibrant, healthy skin.

  1. Macronutrient Composition and Glycemic Load: The Western diet, rich in simple carbohydrates and saturated fats, correlates with increased skin wrinkles. High-glycemic diets may contribute to inflammatory skin conditions like acne and eczema. Sugar consumption and sun exposure accelerate glycation, damaging collagen and hastening skin ageing.
  2. Fatty Acid Composition: Fatty acids are essential for maintaining skin structure and function. A balanced intake of omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids is vital. Excessive omega-6 fats promote inflammation, while omega-3 fats from fish oil alleviate inflammation and benefit inflammatory skin conditions.
  3. Micronutrient & Antioxidant Density: Whole foods rich in micronutrients and antioxidants support skin health. Green tea catechins, berry anthocyanins, citrus bioflavonoids, and carotenoids like lycopene and lutein offer potent antioxidant protection for the skin.
  4. Sodium and Hypertension: High-sodium Western diets may exacerbate hypertension and compromise skin microcirculation. Lowering sodium intake can improve skin capillary density, benefiting skin health.
  5. Caloric Intake: Caloric restriction promotes longevity and healthier skin ageing by enhancing skin cell renewal and repair mechanisms.


Is there an optimal diet for skin health?

The Mediterranean diet emerges as a potent catalyst for health and longevity, backed by scientific research. Anchored in a rich tapestry of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, and the heart-healthy monounsaturated fats found in olive oil, this dietary paradigm is a beacon of wellness.

Epidemiological studies underscore the Mediterranean diet's prowess in enhancing cardiovascular, cognitive, and metabolic well-being. However, its benefits extend beyond internal health to the skin, heralding an era of holistic wellness.

Notably, the Mediterranean diet wields an anti-inflammatory influence, partly attributed to its cornerstone ingredient—extra virgin olive oil. Rich in compounds that combat oxidative stress and inflammation, olive oil boasts oleocanthal, a potent anti-inflammatory akin to ibuprofen. Recent research reveals its potential in safeguarding skin health.

In a landmark Italian study, researchers delved into the relationship between dietary habits and skin health among over 600 individuals, including control subjects and those with cutaneous melanoma. Through meticulous analysis, factors like seafood consumption, omega-3-rich fish, tea intake, and abundant fruits and vegetables emerged as protective elements for skin well-being.

​What topical Interventions are there to restore skin health at Skin Renewal?

Since their introduction in the 1980’s, "cosmeceuticals" (a topical product that exerts both cosmetic and therapeutic benefits), have continued to evolve to ward off the signs of skin aging. In the last few years, skin cell regenerating creams have been brought to market to combat the signs of skin ageing. The gold standard for skin rejuvenation is retinoids such as retinol, retinaldehyde and retinoic acid.

A new concept for skin ageing is to include the GRASS principles into one skin rejuvenation program:

  • G - for growth factors and peptides which stimulate collagen production
  • R - for retinoids, which stimulate collagen
  • A - for antioxidants to protect the collagen that you have
  • S- sunscreen to prevent skin ageing from UV and Infrared radiation
  • S - speciality creams for acne, pigmentation, rosacea, dryness, pores, and oiliness.

The use of alpha hydroxy acids (AHAs) (patented by Neostrata) has been shown to improve skin texture and reduce the signs of ageing by promoting cell shedding in the outer layers of the epidermis and by restoring hydration. They often improve skin texture and treat mild to moderate photo damage.

The most common ingredients used in formulations and peels include;

  • Citric Acid
  • Glycolic Acid
  • Lactic Acid
  • Malic Acid
  • Pyruvic Acid
  • Phytic Acid
What nutritional supplementation is there to combat skin ageing?

Skin nutritional formulations differ from topical products as they are ingested orally, allowing for distribution throughout the body via the bloodstream. This internal approach enables bioactive compounds to reach all layers of the skin, providing comprehensive protection and support.

Essential minerals like selenium, copper, and molybdenum play key roles in maintaining antioxidant defence systems within the skin. Recent additions to beneficial supplements include natural ingredients such as turmeric, resveratrol, coenzyme Q10, and selenium/vitamin E.

Clinical research indicates that selenium supplementation and vitamin E can reduce acne lesions and improve skin appearance, especially in individuals with low glutathione peroxidase activity.

Carotenoids in orange and red fruits and vegetables offer antioxidant protection to the skin. Lycopene, predominantly found in tomatoes, demonstrates significant photoprotective effects against UV radiation, reducing reddening and inflammation post-exposure.

​Why does one need to supplement with Vitamin D3?

Vitamin D3 is crucial for skin health, synthesised in the skin through UVB exposure. Its active form, calcitriol, supports skin cell renewal, repairs, and bolsters the immune system while neutralising harmful free radicals. However, widespread Vitamin D3 deficiency prevails due to reduced sun exposure and increased sunscreen usage. Supplementing with the correct dosage and quality is essential to counteract this deficiency and reap the benefits for overall health and well-being.

What Photoprotective Nutrients are there for skin health?

Fern Extract (Polypodium Leucotomos), found in Heliocare products, protects the skin by blocking UV-induced phototoxicity. Clinical studies demonstrate its efficacy in reducing skin reactions and irritation caused by sun exposure, with no observed side effects. It reduces skin reddening, DNA damage, and immune activation induced by UV radiation, making it an effective systemic photoprotective agent. PL extract mainly benefits individuals with sun-sensitive skin, inhibiting dermal allergic responses to sun exposure. Its antioxidant properties inhibit reactive oxygen species production, DNA damage, and apoptosis induced by UV radiation, thus preventing photoaging and photocarcinogenesis. PL also reduces inflammation and DNA mutations caused by sun exposure, making it a promising natural photoprotective agent and a potential adjuvant in phototherapy for various skin diseases.

​What Are Cutting-Edge Topical Ingredients?
  1. Peptide-based Creams: Peptides in skincare stimulate collagen production, combating ageing. Palmitoyl tetrapeptide-3 and Argireline are notable peptides. The former enhances collagen and elastin production, reducing wrinkles without irritation. The latter reduces muscle contraction, diminishing existing wrinkles, especially around the eyes and forehead.
  2. Matrixyl® Synthe’6™: This compound stabilises skin fibres, reducing wrinkles and improving skin volume. Clinical studies show a significant reduction in frown lines and crow’s feet within two months of use. It promotes the synthesis of essential skin matrix constituents, enhancing skin health and appearance.
  3. Hyaluronic Acid: Known for its moisturising and volumising properties, hyaluronic acid reduces the visibility of lines and wrinkles by capturing water molecules.
  4. Plant-based Ceramides: Ceramides, vital for skin hydration, decrease with age. Supplementation with plant-based ceramides improves skin hydration and reduces dryness. Combined with antioxidants, they optimize the absorption and utilisation of water-soluble antioxidants, further enhancing skin health.


Frequently asked questions

How does your skin age with time?

Each individual has different genetic makeup and lifestyle habits, this will contribute to changes in normal physiological functions within the skin, and may lead to decline by 50% by middle age.

Within the skin, ageing is associated with various biological changes: a loss of fibrous tissue, a slower rate of cellular renewal, and a reduced vascular and glandular network.

Barrier function to protect the skin and maintain cellular hydration also becomes impaired. The subcutaneous tissue (hypodermis) flattens, particularly affecting the face, hands and feet.

To prevent rapid deterioration of youthful skin, action must be taken to support the skin's intrinsic defense systems. Fortunately, through the latest scientific innovations and practices, it is possible to dramatically slow down and potentially reverse the signs and symptoms of accelerated skin ageing.

What is the anatomy and function of the skin?

The skin comprises three distinct layers: the epidermis, dermis, and hypodermis, each with unique cellular compositions and functions.

  • The epidermis, the outermost layer, contains keratin and melanin, providing strength and colour, along with immune cells like Langerhans cells. It acts as a barrier against environmental stressors.
  • The dermis, beneath the epidermis, houses nerves, blood vessels, and fibroblasts, supporting the skin's structure with collagen, elastin fibres, and various substances like hyaluronic acid.
  • The hypodermis, the deepest layer, contains adipocytes and connective tissues, aiding in insulation and heat preservation. Additionally, the skin features sebaceous and sweat glands, which are crucial for moisture production, bacterial protection, and thermoregulation.
What are dietary strategies to promote combat skin ageing?

The skin's visual prominence makes it a focal point for the beauty industry's efforts to enhance appearance through topical treatments. Yet, the importance of supporting skin health from within often goes overlooked. Proper nutrition and supplementation play crucial roles in achieving vibrant, healthy skin.

  1. Macronutrient Composition and Glycemic Load: The Western diet, rich in simple carbohydrates and saturated fats, correlates with increased skin wrinkles. High-glycemic diets may contribute to inflammatory skin conditions like acne and eczema. Sugar consumption and sun exposure accelerate glycation, damaging collagen and hastening skin ageing.
  2. Fatty Acid Composition: Fatty acids are essential for maintaining skin structure and function. A balanced intake of omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids is vital. Excessive omega-6 fats promote inflammation, while omega-3 fats from fish oil alleviate inflammation and benefit inflammatory skin conditions.
  3. Micronutrient & Antioxidant Density: Whole foods rich in micronutrients and antioxidants support skin health. Green tea catechins, berry anthocyanins, citrus bioflavonoids, and carotenoids like lycopene and lutein offer potent antioxidant protection for the skin.
  4. Sodium and Hypertension: High-sodium Western diets may exacerbate hypertension and compromise skin microcirculation. Lowering sodium intake can improve skin capillary density, benefiting skin health.
  5. Caloric Intake: Caloric restriction promotes longevity and healthier skin ageing by enhancing skin cell renewal and repair mechanisms.


Is there an optimal diet for skin health?

The Mediterranean diet emerges as a potent catalyst for health and longevity, backed by scientific research. Anchored in a rich tapestry of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, and the heart-healthy monounsaturated fats found in olive oil, this dietary paradigm is a beacon of wellness.

Epidemiological studies underscore the Mediterranean diet's prowess in enhancing cardiovascular, cognitive, and metabolic well-being. However, its benefits extend beyond internal health to the skin, heralding an era of holistic wellness.

Notably, the Mediterranean diet wields an anti-inflammatory influence, partly attributed to its cornerstone ingredient—extra virgin olive oil. Rich in compounds that combat oxidative stress and inflammation, olive oil boasts oleocanthal, a potent anti-inflammatory akin to ibuprofen. Recent research reveals its potential in safeguarding skin health.

In a landmark Italian study, researchers delved into the relationship between dietary habits and skin health among over 600 individuals, including control subjects and those with cutaneous melanoma. Through meticulous analysis, factors like seafood consumption, omega-3-rich fish, tea intake, and abundant fruits and vegetables emerged as protective elements for skin well-being.

​What topical Interventions are there to restore skin health at Skin Renewal?

Since their introduction in the 1980’s, "cosmeceuticals" (a topical product that exerts both cosmetic and therapeutic benefits), have continued to evolve to ward off the signs of skin aging. In the last few years, skin cell regenerating creams have been brought to market to combat the signs of skin ageing. The gold standard for skin rejuvenation is retinoids such as retinol, retinaldehyde and retinoic acid.

A new concept for skin ageing is to include the GRASS principles into one skin rejuvenation program:

  • G - for growth factors and peptides which stimulate collagen production
  • R - for retinoids, which stimulate collagen
  • A - for antioxidants to protect the collagen that you have
  • S- sunscreen to prevent skin ageing from UV and Infrared radiation
  • S - speciality creams for acne, pigmentation, rosacea, dryness, pores, and oiliness.

The use of alpha hydroxy acids (AHAs) (patented by Neostrata) has been shown to improve skin texture and reduce the signs of ageing by promoting cell shedding in the outer layers of the epidermis and by restoring hydration. They often improve skin texture and treat mild to moderate photo damage.

The most common ingredients used in formulations and peels include;

  • Citric Acid
  • Glycolic Acid
  • Lactic Acid
  • Malic Acid
  • Pyruvic Acid
  • Phytic Acid
What nutritional supplementation is there to combat skin ageing?

Skin nutritional formulations differ from topical products as they are ingested orally, allowing for distribution throughout the body via the bloodstream. This internal approach enables bioactive compounds to reach all layers of the skin, providing comprehensive protection and support.

Essential minerals like selenium, copper, and molybdenum play key roles in maintaining antioxidant defence systems within the skin. Recent additions to beneficial supplements include natural ingredients such as turmeric, resveratrol, coenzyme Q10, and selenium/vitamin E.

Clinical research indicates that selenium supplementation and vitamin E can reduce acne lesions and improve skin appearance, especially in individuals with low glutathione peroxidase activity.

Carotenoids in orange and red fruits and vegetables offer antioxidant protection to the skin. Lycopene, predominantly found in tomatoes, demonstrates significant photoprotective effects against UV radiation, reducing reddening and inflammation post-exposure.

​Why does one need to supplement with Vitamin D3?

Vitamin D3 is crucial for skin health, synthesised in the skin through UVB exposure. Its active form, calcitriol, supports skin cell renewal, repairs, and bolsters the immune system while neutralising harmful free radicals. However, widespread Vitamin D3 deficiency prevails due to reduced sun exposure and increased sunscreen usage. Supplementing with the correct dosage and quality is essential to counteract this deficiency and reap the benefits for overall health and well-being.

What Photoprotective Nutrients are there for skin health?

Fern Extract (Polypodium Leucotomos), found in Heliocare products, protects the skin by blocking UV-induced phototoxicity. Clinical studies demonstrate its efficacy in reducing skin reactions and irritation caused by sun exposure, with no observed side effects. It reduces skin reddening, DNA damage, and immune activation induced by UV radiation, making it an effective systemic photoprotective agent. PL extract mainly benefits individuals with sun-sensitive skin, inhibiting dermal allergic responses to sun exposure. Its antioxidant properties inhibit reactive oxygen species production, DNA damage, and apoptosis induced by UV radiation, thus preventing photoaging and photocarcinogenesis. PL also reduces inflammation and DNA mutations caused by sun exposure, making it a promising natural photoprotective agent and a potential adjuvant in phototherapy for various skin diseases.

​What Are Cutting-Edge Topical Ingredients?
  1. Peptide-based Creams: Peptides in skincare stimulate collagen production, combating ageing. Palmitoyl tetrapeptide-3 and Argireline are notable peptides. The former enhances collagen and elastin production, reducing wrinkles without irritation. The latter reduces muscle contraction, diminishing existing wrinkles, especially around the eyes and forehead.
  2. Matrixyl® Synthe’6™: This compound stabilises skin fibres, reducing wrinkles and improving skin volume. Clinical studies show a significant reduction in frown lines and crow’s feet within two months of use. It promotes the synthesis of essential skin matrix constituents, enhancing skin health and appearance.
  3. Hyaluronic Acid: Known for its moisturising and volumising properties, hyaluronic acid reduces the visibility of lines and wrinkles by capturing water molecules.
  4. Plant-based Ceramides: Ceramides, vital for skin hydration, decrease with age. Supplementation with plant-based ceramides improves skin hydration and reduces dryness. Combined with antioxidants, they optimize the absorption and utilisation of water-soluble antioxidants, further enhancing skin health.


skin-renewal-monogram

Good experience. Everything well explained by therapist before initiating, such professional service!

More
skin-renewal-monogram

Excellent professional and friendly service. Definitely recommend to others for aesthetic as well as the Spa experience.

More
skin-renewal-monogram

The facials are wonderful and relaxing and I love hearing advice on how to make my skin look better!

More
skin-renewal-monogram

Cheray is an excellent therapist and the experience was wonderful. Her manner, gentleness and expertise is an asset.

More
skin-renewal-monogram

I am satisfied with my treatments and I always feel comfortable. The knowledge and support of products and treatments are excellent!

More
skin-renewal-monogram

Wonderful therapist, explains everything well and gives a great service. Very happy with my experience. Thank you!

More
skin-renewal-monogram

I've had wonderful experiences every time I interact with Skin Renewal staff be it over the phone or whenever I come through for treatments. I have been able to achieve my goals with everything I have tried out. All in all great service and the treatments have worked for me!

More
skin-renewal-monogram

To date I've had 2 treatments with Cheray. Both were excellent, Cheray is very professional and skilled in her profession, while at the same time being very warm and friendly. I've also been very happy with the anti-aging results of both treatments.

More
skin-renewal-monogram

Cheray is a wonderful asset to your company. I would not go to another therapist!

skin-renewal-monogram

I had this procedure about 5 years ago and found it extremely painful. The Paracetamol I was offered did nothing for pain relief whilst the lady was busy doing this. I never went back for more treatments. It was a very traumatic experience but I must be honest - my skin (after about 2 months) looked absolutely beautiful. I just think it was too painful.

More
statcounter